Transport yourself to another world – just by stepping outside your door.
What makes a garden an extension of our home – a sanctuary in which to relax and reflect upon our day and to eat and to have a party with our friends and family ?

Is it a question of function, of comfort, of creating a space that represents our lifestyle, design choices and own personal tastes ?
Or is it simply just about being outdoors – catching the breeze, watching the sun set, listening to the evening quiet – and letting nature soothe our souls ? We believe it is all these things.

INDOOR Ξ Architecture is about to create rooms – both inside and outside – that inspire and makes you want to be just there.

Water Gardens

One of our greatest loves has always been water gardening. In fact, we are fascinated by water in the landscape and over the years we have enjoyed the challenge of introducing water into our designs for gardens.
To us, its attraction and overall appeal is the way its slightest noise or movement can change the entire feeling of any space.

Your Water garden might be

  • adventurous swimming and splash pools
  • sensual hot tubs & spas
  • exotic waterfalls
  • romantic water streams
  • graphic water courses
  • water lilies and floating aquatics
  • oriental or japanese water design
  • a lagoon and outdoor spa
  • a canal-style garden
  • stepping stones crossings
  • lightning effects.

Water makes a unique contribution to the garden landscape.

A well-designed water feature, with its constant movement, soothing sounds and endlessly changing reflections, adds light and life to any garden. A lush habitat for unusual and exciting plants, as well as for a rich variety of animal and fish life.

WATER is the magic element,

that controls our lives even before we breathe air into our lungs.
We live surrounded by water, and without it we cannot eat, drink or survive.
Yet water has always been more than just an essential commodity – its great mystical and religious significance spans centuries and cultures.

Most of us will recognize the sense of contentment a tranquil pool can inspire, or the feeling of awe, when confronted by a roaring waterfall.

Usage possibilities:

The appeal and power of water shows no signs of diminishing in our modern age.
Wherever large prestigious buildings spring up, invariably they include some form of indoor or outdoor water feature in an attempt to add life and interest to an otherwise sterile environment.

As some of the best garden designers over the centuries have demonstrated, water offers marvellous possibilities in both garden and landscape design.
Its complete flexibility means that it can suit any type of garden and can even alter the shape of a site visually.
A wide pool, for example, width ways across a long garden will make the garden appear shorter, whereas a long, thin pool running down the length of the garden will make it appear longer.
Visual tricks can be played with mirrors, too, and timber decking can be used to overlap the water’s edge to give the impression that the water flows underneath.

If you want to make the most of a small area, the light-reflecting properties of water can be a great asset.
The gleam of a pool adds an extra dimension and life to a garden, however small.
A stream or watercourse will give a shining ribbon of light by day or moonlight.
Whether lit at night or not, most water features will look good, casting dramatic shadows.

Water doesn’t just reflect light, of course, but like a soft-focus filter on a camera will reflect its surroundings, blurring and magnifying colours and shapes in an attractive approximation of the real world.

Moving forms of surrounding trees, shrubs and marginal plants create an ever-changing pattern on the water’s surface, highlighted by colours of leaves and flowering plants.

A moving water feature, such as a fountain, stream or waterfall, adds yet another dimension – or makes an excellent water scheme in its own right if you lack space for a pool or pond.
As well as adding the visual excitement of white, or moving water, which sparkles and catches the light in a completely different way from still water, it produces sound – anything from gentle splashing to a roar, depending on the size and type of feature.
This opportunity can also be utilized to mask distracting noises and create a far-removed ambience.

Architectural Property Upgrade and Interior Design Expert Practice Services & Product Sale - London, UK

Town Garden

Even the smallest town garden, backyard or balcony can benefit from the creative use of water.
Because of its light-reflecting and magnifying qualities, water in the smallest pond will maximize the effect of plants and other features around it.
A tiny trickle fountain, an old ceramic sink with miniature water lilies, or an old-fashioned baptismal font set into a wall and producing a steady trickle into a tiny pool or pretty bowl will add life to a dull patio area.
In shady corners where there is insufficient light to support plant life, you might have water trickling down sheets of clear glass or perspex, or down thin copper rods in a simple but very effective modern-style waterfall.
For small gardens with a little more scope and sunshine, water can be combined with other features such as a modest rockery with a waterfall, and delicate alpine plants alongside the more dramatic water ones.
Or, in a formal patio garden, build a combined feature of raised pool and vertical garden respectively planting beds.
A deep, raised stone trough with a water lily and a few fish can make a lovely eye-level feature within a formal seating area for the elderly, surrounded by raised beds of sweet-smelling herbs and flowers.
Some of the more formal water features are particularly well-suited to small patio areas where they stand out and where their effect can be closely controlled.
A small formal pool based on a rigid geometric shape is, in fact, a surprisingly flexible starting point for creative design.
A square or rectangular pool, planted with a single clump of reeds, or other specimen plant, perhaps at the foot of an art work, produces a clear mirror effect.
A more ambitious design might have a series of small, similar-shaped pools linked to create patterns, or positioned on different levels, and planted with a limited but complementary selection of water plants.
Other small water features can take advantage of the particular site.

Bog Garden

Sloping ground can be used to create a cascade tumbling through a series of weirs to a pool at its lower level, or a permanently damp area can be turned into a bog garden.
Many of the plants that will grow well in naturally poorly drained or continuously wet areas are superb for the beauty of their flowers and for their architectural form.

Un-urban Ambience

For the really brave, with a suitable sunny site, it is possible to convert the whole area into one continuous water feature with low timber walkways and wooden deck patio areas for eating and sunbathing. The advantages of such a garden are particularly attractive to those who do not take much care for gardening or who have very demanding jobs. As, apart from being easy to maintain, a garden with much of its area given over to water will provide a very un-urban environment.

An expanse of water will make a small garden look much bigger than it really is and, together with clever planting, will distract the eye from its true boundaries. Irregular pond shapes help disguise the shape of the site altogether.

Architectural Property Upgrade and Interior Design Expert Practice Services & Product Sale - London, UK
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